Ten steps to a better humanitarian system

jungs_blogThis is a reblog of a great piece from Nick van Praag, of Ground Truth Solutions. It was also posted by the CHS Alliance. There’s real food for thought here for the World Humanitarian Summit. But who will take the lead in making some of these changes happen? Will any of us stand up and be counted?

This week’s global consultation on the World Humanitarian Summit looks like it will be long on calls for commitment to reform and short on agreement about how to make it happen. Here are my ten suggestions for a better humanitarian system. Continue reading

More on the World Humanitarian Summit: it’s up to us.

I just posted this blog on Plan International’s website. It’s an update on preparations for the World Humanitarian Summit. It’s up to us to make it work.

The message from Kathmandu

The writing’s on the wall in Kathmandu

I’ve been working with the World Humanitarian Summit team over the last year, preparing for the huge summit looming in Istanbul next May. The whole process has its ups and downs. But it remains a unique opportunity to drive real progress in the sector. And we all have a role to play in making it succeed.

From a meeting in Berlin last week, it looks like the summit team will have to focus on headline reforms that need political commitment at the highest level. These are areas like: working out a new deal for hosting refugees, localising leadership for humanitarian action and global leadership for innovation or work in urban settings. Continue reading

Is a TripAdvisor for aid agencies a runner?

somalia_2

Is there anybody there?

The idea of a “TripAdvisor for humanitarian aid” surfaced again in the World Humanitarian Summit consultations. Is it a runner?

On the face of it, it’s got a lot to offer. Recipients could rate the services they receive, using smartphones and a standard on-line platform. Their assessments would be publically available, creating a new level of transparency and accountability for aid agencies. Everyone would be able to see which agencies are doing well and agencies would have incentives to drive up performance.

It’s a good idea in theory. Continue reading

Making the most of the World Humanitarian Summit

WHS picturePreparations for the World Humanitarian Summit are heating up. The vast consultation process is coming to an end. I’ve been closely involved in work on ‘community engagement’ and accountability to affected people. Can you help strengthen recommendations in this area? Continue reading

Lessons from Haiyan: five steps to improve accountability to affected people

Humanitarian Exchange #63 coverI spent a fascinating morning this week at the launch of a special edition of Humanitarian Exchange on The Typhoon Haiyan Response in the Philippines. (Video to follow soon.)

We discussed how aid agencies can be more accountable to the people they serve. (“Accountability to Affected People”, AAP, in the jargon. Of which more below.) In general, this means enabling them to influence what we do. Continue reading

Easy ways for philanthropic donors to see if they’re doing well

A re-post from the Social Impact Analysts Association. The excellent and experienced Caroline Fiennes from Giving Evidence describes simple ways for funders to measure their performance. The ideas are widely applicable to NGOs.

The approach is based on exactly the same principle as this site: focus on your performance, not their impact. I also loved some of Caroline’s other blogs, like Most Charities Shouldn’t Evaluate Their Work: Part One Why not?

Caroline Fiennes
Some skiers are better than others. Some singers are better than others. The same for teaching, nursing and curling. So it seems reasonable to suppose that some people are better at supporting charities than others.

Continue reading

State of the art resource: Keystone’s technical note

Newsflash! A great new resource has just been published on how to get – and use – powerful feedback from the people NGOs work with.

It’s Keystone’s first Technical Note on Constituent Voice methodology: required reading for anyone interested in feedback systems in NGOs. Continue reading